Most of the research is attributed to "SPSU," which is presumably St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, and some of the research, it is suggested, was conducted at the Kirov Military Medical Academy, though it's unclear why a military academy would conduct clinical research on civilian cell phone radiation. The names of the scientists who conducted these studies are conspicuously absent, as are any published results.
Most mobile phones come with a charger upon purchase, but sometimes the phone outlasts the charger. Cell phone chargers also have a history of being left behind at work, home or at a hotel room when you need them the most. Make sure that you have an extra one on hand when you need it, and consider adding a charger that you can use in your vehicle. Chargers are powered either with a wall adapter or via a USB adapter that connects to a PC, tablet or similar device. Car chargers are usually powered by connecting it to the vehicle through the DC connector, which is located in or around the vehicle's dash.
As I demonstrate in the video, you can see that with this router, I am exposed to about 100 times more Radio Frequency (RF) energy when I’m next to the router versus standing 20 feet away. This measurement video, like the others in our Video Library, give you an example of the varying levels of energy coming from our WiFi Routers.  If I was using the same meter on say, your WiFi, the measurements could vary widely. 
"To expect relief from radiation exposure from one specific device, is nearly impossible. It’s crucial to weigh in the MANY environmental factors; such as, temperature, atmospheric pressure, other radio waves, emissions from other devices, energy shifts from others around you, and Schumann Resonance shifts. Therefore," he explains that “relying on alteration of the environment as a safety precaution is always a game of chance…and signals affect people differently,” which adds another variables in the game of chance.
Released in 1993 as a joint creation of IBM and BellSouth, this was the first smartphone. A fax machine, a PDA, a pager and a mobile phone, the IBM Simon featured no physical keys, but used a touchscreen and optional stylus. Amazingly, it included applications such as games, email, a notepad, calculator, world clock, address book and a calendar. It only sold in the United States, for $899.
Another animal study, in which rats were exposed 7 days per week for 19 hours per day to radiofrequency radiation at 0.001, 0.03, and 0.1 watts per kilogram of body weight was reported by investigators at the Italian Ramazzini Institute (35). Among the rats with the highest exposure levels, the researchers noted an increase in heart schwannomas in male rats and non-malignant Schwann cell growth in the heart in male and female rats. However, key details necessary for interpretation of the results were missing: exposure methods, other standard operating procedures, and nutritional/feeding aspects. The gaps in the report from the study raise questions that have not been resolved.
It should be noted that the given values of SAR were normalized to 1 W peak antenna power output, while typically a WLAN antenna radiates about 10 mW; therefore, for a real world operating system, maximum SAR of 0.37 × 10−3 and 0.18 × 10−3 (W/kg) is expected for 2 and 1 active antennas, respectively, which are 104 times lower than the European safety limit (2 W/kg) [IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Humans, 2005].
Here we studied the influence of microwave irradiation at bands corresponding to wireless router (WLAN) and mobile devices (GSM) on leaf anatomy, essential oil content and volatile emissions in Petroselinum crispum, Apium graveolens and Anethum graveolens. Microwave irradiation resulted in thinner cell walls, smaller chloroplasts and mitochondria, and enhanced emissions of volatile compounds, in particular, monoterpenes and green leaf volatiles. There was a direct relationship between microwave-induced structural and chemical modifications of the three plant species studied. These data collectively demonstrate that human-generated microwave pollution can potentially constitute a stress to the plants.

... our review shows that there is a substantial amount of studies which indicate that plants have experienced physiological or morphological changes due to radiofrequency radiation and show statistically significant changes for the short-term exposure duration (up to 13 weeks). In contrast, the results obtained from the long-term exposure studies (two publications using nine different exposures with exposure duration between 3 months to 6 years) support no physiological effects on plants when exposed to radiofrequency radiation from mobile phone radiation. This would bring a remarkable point to the discussion about the apparent absence of response to the long-term exposure that may be interpreted as adaptations. On the other hand, phenotypic plasticity of plants will permit them to change their structure and function; hence, plants to adapt to environmental change (Nicotra et al., 2010). Plants are naturally affected by environmental stresses due to their immobility. Plants could respond to the environmental factors of wind, rain, electric field and ultraviolet radiation and adjust its physiological condition to adapt to the change of environment (Braam and Davis, 1990; Braam et al., 1996; Mary and Braam, 1997) .... our previous findings (Halgamuge et al., 2015) indicate that the biological effects considerably relied on field strength and amplitude modulation of the applied field.
To be sure, the industry could not have been pleased with some of the Interphone study’s conclusions. The study found that the heaviest cell-phone users were 80 percent more likely to develop glioma. (The initial finding of 40 percent was increased to 80 to correct for selection bias.) The Interphone study also concluded that individuals who had owned a cell phone for 10 years or longer saw their risk of glioma increase by nearly 120 percent. However, the study did not find any increased risk for individuals who used their cell phones less frequently; nor was there evidence of any connection with meningioma.36
In response, we would state that all wireless frequencies currently used by the public are categorized as radiofrequency radiation. People have not been using Wi-Fi for as long as they have been using cell phones, so the research that has looked at long term use of cell phones is very important in considering the long term health risks from wireless and Wi-Fi specifically.
I am shin datuin..a radiologic technologist..I never thought that electromagnetic radiation is harmful to our health because according to our studies.. EMR is safe (example:radiation of MRI..wifi..) I became hypersensitive to EMR after using the USB modem (the 4G internet)..Because when you download a file.. the EMR of 4G internet/USB modem boost it’s signal capacity/transmission rate and damages your cells in the body specifically to the brain.. 16 hours or above of downloading will break your immune system to electromagnetic radiation (maybe it varies on your body size)..But after the 16 hours of exposure.. my body inhibits the symptoms of feeling tired.. headache.. dizziness..nausea..fast heartbeat..I felt like someone is touching at the back of my head (occipital region).. So i shut off the USB modem and the symptoms were gone after few hours of rest.. But even now.. i’m having this problem when i’m at the High EMR areas.. so i minimize using our wifi router.. Anyway.. wifi signal or transmission can be setup to minimum capacity..So set it up before it’s too late.. Be safe guys!
The aim of this study was to determine the structural changes in the frontal cortex, brainstem and cerebellum in the male rat brain due to electromagnetic wave exposure (900, 1800, 2450 MHz, 1h/day for 2 months). While the histopathological changes in the frontal cortex and brainstem were normal in the control group, there were severe degenerative changes, shrunken cytoplasm and extensively dark pyknotic nuclei in the EMR groups. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the Total Antioxidative Capacity level was significantly decreased in the EMR groups and also Total Oxidative Capacity and Oxidative Stress Index levels were significantly increased in the frontal cortex, brainstem and cerebellum. Researchers concluded that EMR causes structural changes in the frontal cortex, brainstem and cerebellum and impairs the oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine system. This deterioration can cause to disease including loss of these areas function and cancer development.
While cell phones localize the highest microwave exposure to the brain, Wi-Fi  exposures are often localized to the abdomen, leg and chest area. However this is not always the case as some people sleep in rooms with Wi-Fi baby monitors, Wi-Fi routers or Wi-Fi gaming devices near their pillow. Wi-Fi printers may be in offices next to a person’s desk and most people are unaware that they transmit continuously. All in all, for some people- especially children- the Wi-Fi exposure is quite significant to overall cumulative exposure.
They're ok, though there's a nasty chemical processing smell to the stickers. I'm still not sure they're worth what they're made of. No instructions, testimonials, or even a product insert label, when you get them in a pretty, smelly gold sleeve, though you don't really need instructions for stickers, lol. They're very durable and don't wear easily, despite pressure and contact w/ many surfaces & objects. The price increased $4 since I ordered them. That said, the designs on them are beautiful. I just don't understand what I paid for, & it would be nice if there were tests on devices like this, proving that they actually absorb or render harmless, various wireless frequencies, and at what range. If they were cheaper, I might order 2 more packs just to see if they made a difference if placed closer together in larger quantity. I have 3 on my laptop & have noticed a very slight reduction in sensitivity to EMF. I didn't notice this slight difference until I put 1 sticker where my right hand rests on the keyboard. I had originally placed 2 on the base of the laptop, 1 over the wifi card, & 1 over the processor, and it made zero difference. I left things like that for 2 weeks, before I decided to try putting one of the stickers on the keyboard area. I'm still not clear on whether or not I'd buy this product again, but like the seller, Crownstarqi, b/c they are sending me a few more stickers so that I can see if multiple stickers on more devices makes a difference. This is very kind of them, & they have great customer follow-up. -Account holder's progeny.
An Oct. 20, 2011 study of 358,403 Danish citizens – the largest study of its kind to date – concluded that "there was no association between tumors of the central nervous system or brain and long term (10 years +) use of mobile phones." [39] A July 27, 2011 study found that there was no association between cell phone use and brain tumor risks among children and adolescents. [50] Numerous other studies published from 2001-2013 have similarly concluded that there is no association between cell phone use and the development of brain tumors. [1] [41] [42] [45] [46] [49]
Lack of definitive proof that a technology is harmful does not mean the technology is safe, yet the wireless industry has succeeded in selling this logical fallacy to the world. In truth, the safety of wireless technology has been an unsettled question since the industry’s earliest days. The upshot is that, over the past 30 years, billions of people around the world have been subjected to a massive public-health experiment: Use a cell phone today, find out later if it causes cancer or genetic damage. Meanwhile, the wireless industry has obstructed a full and fair understanding of the current science, aided by government agencies that have prioritized commercial interests over human health and news organizations that have failed to inform the public about what the scientific community really thinks. In other words, this public-health experiment has been conducted without the informed consent of its subjects, even as the industry keeps its thumb on the scale.27
50. Model the behavior you want to see from your child. “Model the manners and behavior you want to see. Avoid texting in the car. Consider narrating your phone use (“I’m looking up directions to the party”) so young kids understand the utility of the device. Make sure to excuse yourself if you have to interrupt a family moment to attend to your phone.” – My Kid Texts Constantly! What Can I Do?, Common Sense Media; Twitter: @CommonSense
I’m so glad I stumbled on this article as I thought I was the only one around my area that gets badly affected by Wi-Fi signals. It started when I used to visit my son I would get heart palpitations and my throat felt like it was tightening up, after leaving it would eventually calm down but every time I went it got worse. I then also got Wi-Fi and was really ill for about eight weeks felt like I was slowly being poisoned, tight throat, palpitations, weakness and really bad sleep, just felt like I was dying. I then realised it
This study investigated if supplemental selenium (Se) and L-carnitine may reduce the adverse effect 2.45 GHz electromagnetic radiation can have on testicular apoptosis using rats as a study animal. Electromagnetic radiation exposure resulted in testicular apoptosis in rats, mainly by the intrinsic pathways by down-regulated expression of caspase-8. Reduction in the activation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis was found higher with selenium administration compared with L-carnitine administration.
12. Contact your bank about a stolen phone. “Let your bank know if your phone or tablet is lost or stolen: If you use your mobile device for banking, it’s a good idea to alert your bank if your smartphone or tablet goes missing, even if you have a strong password and haven’t saved cookies from a previous session. That way, the bank can monitor your account for suspicious activities and set you up with new security measures right away.” – Stephen Ebbett, 6 Tips for Avoiding Identity Theft When Mobile Banking, About Money; Twitter: @AboutMoney
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