There are few if any references to actual studies in published, peer-reviewed journals that support the claim that Aires, or any other, cell phone shield actually works. The "Researches" page contains a superficially impressive list of sciencey-sounding titles and findings supposedly demonstrating the importance of using cell phone shields, all of them in Russia for some reason.
Infertility is a common disorder that affects 15% of couples and nearly half of the cases are due to male infertility. As mentioned above, RF-EMR affects many organs including the testes by a direct or a thermal effect [6]. In one study, detrimental effects of RF-EMR on Leydig cells, seminiferous tubules, and especially the spermatozoa were clearly defined [1]. Although RF-EMR reduces testosterone levels, impairs spermatogenesis, and causes sperm DNA damage [4], the relationship between RF-EMR devices and male infertility is still controversial.
In September 2014, Californian oncologists reported four similar case histories of young women who had developed breast cancer in precisely the areas where they normally carried their smartphones. What shocked the doctors was that these women were aged 21 to 39 and had no family history or other risk factors relating to cancer. All their cancers “had striking similarity, all tumours were hormone positive… (with) an extensive intraductal component and… near-identical morphology.” (CaseRepMed., 2013).
As our video points out: Measurements will vary with signal strength and other factors and that includes ambient energy. I talk about ambient energy in a lot of my videos-it's the energy that's in whatever environment I happen to be measuring in that's coming from a source of wireless energy that isn't the subject of what I'm measuring.  My home is not a lab of course, but fortunately it's always measured very low for RF radiation. 
It’s also packing a decent camera, so your kid can share selfies without worrying about the quality. It’s not perfect, and the battery life might not last as long as you’d like — but Motorola’s TurboPower charging means 15 minutes of charging can give six hours of battery life. Sit your kid down to dinner and plug their phone in, and it should be more than ready to see them through to bedtime. All in all, the Moto G6 is an extremely solid phone that should serve your child well.
This experiment investigated the effects of 2.45 GHz microwave radiation exposure (2h/day for 35 days) on the developing rat brain.The study revealed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) decrease in protein kinase C activity in hippocampus as compared to the remaining portion of the whole brain and the control group, while a similar experiment conducted on hippocampus and the whole brain gave a similar result. Electron microscopic study shows an increase in the glial cell population in the exposed group as compared to the control group. This present study is indicative of a significant change after exposure to the above-mentioned field intensity, which suggests that chronic exposures may affect brain growth and development.
The FCC’s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.
A few years ago, the science regarding links between cell phone radiation and various health ailments was a very emergent science. Even today, most scientists disagree about many of the findings. However, the fact that so many new studies are discovering effects that cell phone radiation can have on human biology, it makes sense to play it safe. If there are no negative health effects, then you're only out a few bucks. But if it turns out there really are serious health issues related to cell phone radiation, then by protecting yourself early, you can protect your health and potentially save your life by getting a cell phone anti-radiation shield.
Wheeler’s tactics succeeded in dousing the controversy. Although Carlo had in fact repeatedly briefed Wheeler and other senior industry officials on the studies, which had indeed undergone peer review and would soon be published, reporters on the technology beat accepted Wheeler’s discrediting of Carlo and the WTR’s findings. (Wheeler would go on to chair the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates the wireless industry. He agreed to an interview for this article but then put all of his remarks off the record, with one exception: his statement that he has always taken scientific guidance from the US Food and Drug Administration, which, he said, “has concluded, ‘the weight of scientific evidence had not linked cell phones with any health problems.’”)11
Joel Moskowitz (@berkeleyprc) of the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health, US, says: “This is the largest technological experiment in the history of our species, with potential health risks we still know next to nothing about.” This view is shared by Denis Henshaw, professor of human radiation effects at Bristol University, UK, who said: “Vast numbers of people are using cell phones and this could be a time bomb of health problems.”
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